THIS WEEKEND: Echo Park Rising Music Festival

first_imgUncategorizedTHIS WEEKEND: Echo Park Rising Music FestivalA charmingly hpyer-local music fest with an inclusive vibeBy Elina Shatkin – August 16, 2013728ShareEmailFacebookTwitterPinterestReddItThere’s another music festival happening in Southern California this weekend and it isn’t Coachella or Jubilee or FYF. It’s Echo Park Rising, and this Saturday and Sunday it’s taking over a bunch of venues including Taix, El Prado, The Little Joy, Origami Vinyl, and The Echo (to name just a few).The lineup features all sorts of great local bands. Tonight’s kickoff party at The Echoplex showcases Them Jeans and Hott MT, but there are two full days of music including Henry Clay People, Chicano Batman, Dorian Wood, and genre-bending electro pop headliner Big Black Delta (to name just a few).The fest feels charmingly hyper-local with a wide swath of businesses banding together to support and participate in the event. And you won’t need a layaway plan to afford the shockingly inexpensive tickets: $20-25 for a two-day VIP pass. If you get tired of all that music, use the map above to wander around the ‘hood, maybe pop into Stories bookstore to peruse a surrealistic novel about hobo vampires or sip some suds at Sunset Beer Co. Traffic will probably be gnarly so we recommend biking, busing, or using one of those app-driven car services. (First time UBER users get $20 off their ride with the passcode EPRISING.) In case the idea of a truly local music fest with an inclusive vibe doesn’t float your boat, there are about a million other things happening this weekend. TAGSEcho ParkEcho Park RisingEventFestivalL.A. CultureMusicWeekend EventsPrevious articlePUPDATE: Catching Up With Annie Hart And The Tupperware PupsNext articleThe Can’t Miss Events at This Year’s L.A. Food & WineElina Shatkin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORWhat to Know About What’s Happening in Echo ParkThe Homeless Republic of Echo Park: Life (and a Death) in L.A.’s Fastest-Growing Tent CityFollow in Pee-wee Herman’s Footsteps Across L.A.last_img read more

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News / Rhenus opens mega-warehouse in India as new lockdowns impact logistics

first_img Rhenus Logistics has opened a mega-warehouse in India, continuing its Asia Pacific network expansion.The 350,000sq ft facility in the city of Gurugram, south-west of Delhi, has capacity for 30,000 pallet positions and primarily serves customers in the consumer goods, automotive, engineering, industrial and chemicals sectors.According to Vivek Arya, managing director of Rhenus Logistics India, the new flagship facility will “set standards” for Asian warehousing.“Being located in one of the largest consumption areas across Asia, the new mega-warehouse is an important link to the Rhenus Asia network,” he told The Loadstar.Rhenus now has more than 30 warehouses in India with a combined footprint of 1.9m sq feet.Last year, Rhenus said it was experiencing greater emphasis on localisation, as companies focused on growing their businesses within their own borders, resulting in growth within China’s domestic market, for example, as well as for intra-Asia trades.Mr Arya said it was too early to draw any conclusions from how the coronavirus pandemic might impact manufacturing trends within Asia, but does believe many firms will rethink supply chains by increasing inventories, adding: “We are also observing increased traction in the e-commerce segment.”Across the country meanwhile, Mr Arya said, the lockdown situation continues to impact operations.“When the lockdown was first imposed, it impacted the entire country including the logistics sector. All operations came to a standstill but were gradually resumed in April, starting with essential goods and clearance of cargo from major ports, like Nava Sheva and Chennai to the warehouses.”Almost all Indian warehouses are now operational for all goods, he added, but there were some limitations impacting day-to-day productivity. For example, social distancing means fewer workers and increased segregation of shifts, restricted operating hours due to government curfews and commuting problems for employees because of the continued disruption to public transport.Mr Arya added: “The overall situation remains volatile due to local restrictions, such as the new recent lockdown imposed in Chennai and three neighbouring districts.“In addition, many warehouses are seeing a huge surge in storage demand due to the pile-up of import cargo. Many warehouses are overflowing because many of the industries have yet to start fully.” By Sam Whelan 22/06/2020last_img read more

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Former Athenahealth CEO Jonathan Bush joins health care startup

first_img GET STARTED Former Athenahealth CEO Jonathan Bush joins health care startup Health Tech For Jonathan Bush, there is life after Athenahealth.The outspoken former chief executive of the Watertown, Mass., company has landed a new gig as executive chairman of the Boston startup Firefly Health, which aims to provide primary care for patients through an app as well as clinic and employer visits. Unlock this article — and get additional analysis of the technologies disrupting health care — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED About the Author Reprints Jon Chesto — Boston Globe What is it? [email protected] Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Athenahealth CEO Jonathan Bush (right) talks with Steve Clemons of The Atlantic in 2018. What’s included? Log In | Learn More By Jon Chesto — Boston Globe Sept. 16, 2019 Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. @jonchesto Tags BostonHealth ITSTAT+last_img read more

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Pfizer’s top-selling vaccine won’t prevent Covid-19, but could get a boost because of it

first_img About the Author Reprints What’s included? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Tags pharmaceuticalsSTAT+ Biotech Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Log In | Learn More Ruby Wallau for STAT Matthew Herper Senior Writer, Medicine, Editorial Director of Events Matthew covers medical innovation — both its promise and its perils.center_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What is it? Pfizer’s top-selling vaccine won’t prevent Covid-19, but could get a boost because of it By Matthew Herper March 20, 2020 Reprints GET STARTED [email protected] @matthewherper Vaccines tend to get a bad reputation among biotech investors. Which makes it easy to forget that Pfizer’s top-selling product, with $5.8 billion in annual sales, is a vaccine: Prevnar 13.Now Prevnar may be seeing a boost because of worries about the novel coronavirus, according to Umer Raffat, an analyst at Evercore ISI, an investment bank.last_img read more

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In a new hospital ranking, doing good counts nearly as much as doing well

first_imgHospitalsIn a new hospital ranking, doing good counts nearly as much as doing well Senior Writer, Science and Discovery (1956-2021) Sharon covered science and discovery. Adobe You won’t find the usual suspects like Massachusetts General Hospital or the Mayo Clinic at the top of a new ranking of U.S. hospitals. That’s because the rating system relies not just on traditional quality measures, but also on a hospital’s community-minded policies and avoidance of unnecessary care.The rankings show that those hospitals with good clinical outcomes tend to score poorly in addressing inequities that affect the health of their communities. And even when hospitals perform many low-value procedures — those that research has shown to be of limited or no benefit — their patients generally have a low risk of dying both in the hospital and after being discharged, as well as a low risk of having to be readmitted.No previous hospital rankings use “civic leadership,” which includes community-minded policies such as charity care, financial aid, and paying all staffers a living wage, or “value of care,” meaning whether a hospital avoids 13 procedures of questionable or clearly absent clinical benefit. The Lown Institute, a nonprofit think tank in Brookline, Mass., incorporated both measures into its rankings of 3,282 hospitals because “it is time for hospitals to rethink what it means to be great,” said Lown’s president, physician Vikas Saini.advertisement Privacy Policy Related: Civic leadership matters because the health of the people in a hospital’s community “reflect things outside the four walls of a hospital,” he said. “If one patient is going back to a community without a lot of resources, where health equity is low, and another is going back to a wealthier community, their [long-term] health will be very different even if the quality of care in the hospital was identical. Hospitals have an obligation to improve the health of the outside community.”Veterans of hospital rankings generally applauded Lown’s efforts, with caveats.advertisement [email protected] Sharon Begley Comparing the Covid-19 vaccines developed by Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson Please enter a valid email address. Leave this field empty if you’re human: She called Lown’s decision to downgrade a hospital for performing many low-quality procedures “a breakthrough” in hospital ratings. “We know inappropriate care is an extremely significant problem for the health care system,” Binder said. “It’s also a terrible tragedy for individual patients to go through an unnecessary procedure.”The American Hospital Association, however, said in a statement that the report offers consumers no “accurate and useful information,” instead offering “a hodgepodge of composite score, ranking, star ratings, and letter grades that will, at best, confuse consumers and likely mislead them.”In Lown’s composite rankings, which are based on 2017 data from Medicare and other government sources, the top hospitals are JPS Health Network in Fort Worth, Texas; Marshall Medical Center in Placerville, Calif.; UPMC McKeesport in Pennsylvania; Seton Northwest Hospital in Austin, Texas; and Mercy Health-West Hospital in Cincinnati. Each scored A or A+ on all three measures, showing it is possible to do well by the community while also delivering excellent patient care, Saini said.Of course, hospital rankings reflect the values of the groups that produce them. For instance, JPS gets an underwhelming C  from Leapfrog, due to safety failures (patient bedsores and falls), unresponsive doctors and nurses, and surgical problems (wounds splitting open and dangerous blood clots).Of the top 100 in the Lown ranking, 91 are nonprofits. Only nine are safety-net hospitals, even though they account for 21% of the total. That’s probably because these hospitals tend to serve poorer communities, and even if they provide excellent care, patients might not receive the high-quality follow-up care that can keep them alive and healthy. Quality of care includes the percentage of patients who die one month, three months, and one year after their hospital stay.“Life expectancy,” said Saini, often “depends more on your ZIP code than your genetic code” — an argument for hospitals to contribute to community groups that make a ZIP code healthier.The top 100 also includes 53 teaching hospitals, which make up only one-third of all hospitals. Their overrepresentation reflects generally excellent patient outcomes and a culture of avoiding procedures that lack scientific evidence of efficacy.center_img “I love that they’re measuring civic leadership,” said Sara Singer of Stanford University School of Medicine, an expert in health care management. “I also think they’re right to evaluate overuse of low-value procedures: You want to be sure you aren’t going to receive treatments you shouldn’t be receiving.” Trending Now: @sxbegle The starkest disparity is between many hospitals’ excellent patient outcomes and their poor civic leadership, as measured by Lown. (It used Internal Revenue Service and other government data for CEO pay and spending on charity care and community organizations.) The leaders for civic leadership were Harris Health System in Houston and five New York City public hospitals.On average, 2.8% of hospital expenses went to charity care. But while the most charitable spent 15% or more, about 150 spent less than 0.1%. And although some nonprofit hospitals, whose tax-exempt status requires them to provide “community benefits,” spent 20% or more on their community, some spent less than 1%.A number of hospitals renowned for their quality of care got A+ or A for patient outcomes but a D for civic leadership, including Massachusetts General Hospital, the Cleveland Clinic, the Mayo Clinic, and the University of Washington in Seattle. Teaching hospitals such as these do pretty well on supporting their communities, but pay equity — multimillion-dollar salaries for top executives — sinks them in Lown’s calculation of civic leadership. Not a single hospital in the top 100 for patient outcomes was in the top 100 for civic leadership, and vice versa.Few patients are likely to reject a hospital based on how much it pays its CEO relative to its custodians. But Binder called civic leadership an important metric. “If there is anything you want out of a hospital, it’s ethics,” she said. Charity care, community support, and pay equity “are informative about a hospital’s culture.” About the Author Reprints By Sharon Begley July 7, 2020 Reprints She questioned, however, whether those measures should be bundled into a composite score, as Lown did. Quality of care indicators such as staffing levels and patient outcomes such as surgical mistakes and bedsores account for 50% of a hospital’s composite ranking and associated letter grade, while civic leadership counts for 30% and value of care 20%.“I’m not sure civic leadership should influence where a patient chooses to get care as much as quality measures should,” Singer said, “though I can see using it to decide where you might make a charitable contribution.”In contrast, patients would do well to consider a hospital’s overuse of procedures that research has shown to have little clinical benefit, she said, such as knee arthroscopy, spinal fusions, EEG for headache, hysterectomies for benign conditions such as uterine fibroids or pelvic organ prolapse, and putting stents in renal arteries.Although a patient having, say, a hip replaced might not care whether a hospital performs many vertebroplasties (injecting bone “cement” into vertebrae to treat osteoporosis) or other low-value procedures unrelated to her planned surgery, Singer said, “I can imagine that if a hospital is overtreating patients with these particular procedures, it might overmedicate, oversedate, or overtreat you for what you’re there for, too.” In addition, some low-value care disproportionately affects people of color: Black women are more likely to have unnecessary hysterectomies than white women are.Many hospitals perform high numbers of low-quality procedures, which tend to be lucrative (and waste an estimated $100 billion per year in health care spending). “The right thing to do financially isn’t necessarily the right thing to do for patients,” said Leah Binder, president and CEO of the Leapfrog Group, a nonprofit backed by large employers that aims to identify and promote high-quality, high-value health care and whose hospital ratings emphasize patient safety. Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. Racial bias skews algorithms widely used to guide care from heart surgery to birth, study finds Tags BostonHealth Disparitieshospitalslast_img read more

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LIVE BLOG: Follow all the action as the Laois senior hurlers take on Carlow

first_img Rugby LIVE BLOG: Follow all the action as the Laois senior hurlers take on Carlow WhatsApp Facebook WhatsApp By Siun Lennon – 2nd June 2018 Community Community Twitter Pinterest Home GAA Hurling LIVE BLOG: Follow all the action as the Laois senior hurlers take… GAAHurlingLaois Senior Hurling TeamSport SEE ALSO – Good Week, Bad Week: Fake political candidate, European athletics and birthday celebrationscenter_img Brought to you in association with Hanlon Kitchens Laois and Carlow do battle today in O’Moore Park, with Laois needing a win to have any hopes of progressing to a Joe McDonagh Cup final.Both sides would have fancied their chances at the beginning, but Laois could rue two losses in their opening two games as they now have to hope results go their way, while stay winning themselves.Carlow on the other hand have achieved much of what they would have set out to do, and a win this weekend would put them in a firm position to clinch the final spot, in what would be a repeat of the Division 2A final.We’ll be live-blogging the game on LaoisToday.ie as well as giving some updates on our  LaoisToday Sport Snapchat account.We’ll also be bringing you score updates from the two other games in the Joe McDonagh Cup – between Meath and Kerry and Westmeath and Antrim. TAGSJoe McDonagh CupLaois senior hurlersLaois v CarlowLive Blog Previous articleOnwards and upwards as Fetch your Pet Needs in Mountmellick celebrates one year in businessNext articleLaois’s Joe McDonagh Cup hopes over following defeat to Carlow Siun Lennonhttp://heresosiun.blogspot.ie/2016/09/the-lekkie-piccie-experience.htmlSiún Lennon joined LaoisToday in a full-time capacity after studying Journalism and New Media in the University of Limerick. She hails from Rosenallis and her interests vary from news, sports and politics. Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Ten Laois based players named on Leinster rugby U-18 girls squad Five Laois monuments to receive almost €200,000 in government funding Pinterest Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’last_img read more

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Laois school set to hold 5km run to raise funds for sensory garden

first_img TAGSRaheen N.STobar an Léinn 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshin GAA Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results Twitter Home News Laois school set to hold 5km run to raise funds for sensory… News WhatsApp Twitter WhatsApp Pinterest Laois school set to hold 5km run to raise funds for sensory garden Facebook GAA Previous articleDectector dog Sam sniffs out €97,000 worth of illegal drugs in PortlaoiseNext articleRock of Dunamase under lockdown by Gardai and Defence Forces Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. A Laois primary school is holding a 5km fun run on Friday June 21 in order to raise funds for a sensory garden.Tobair an Leinn NS will hold MidSummer 5km Fun Run at 7.30pm in Raheen in Laois.The race takes place in the village of Raheen, taking a route through the village, then continuing through Dan Tynan’s Farm(all on tarred road) before concluding back in the village.There will be prizes for the first three finishers in the Men’s, Women’s and Youth categories.There is also have a 1km run for younger children and all children that participate will receive a medal.Entry fees are as follows: €10 for one person, €20 for families while the 1km run is €4.Registration is from 6.30pm and a big crowd is expected to attend.The school say: “All funds raised will go towards the school and developing a sensory garden for the school and community.“There will be a 1km fun run for children also. Thank you to Dan Tynan and Staff for the use of their farm. Registration in the school from 6.30pm and refreshments will be served afterwards.“All funds raised will go directly to the school to help build a community sensory garden.”SEE ALSO – Local land and dwellings capture big price at public auction RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook GAA By Alan Hartnett – 19th June 2019 Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory Pinterestlast_img read more

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28 Graduate from CSI Computer Repairs Course

first_imgRelated28 Graduate from CSI Computer Repairs Course 28 Graduate from CSI Computer Repairs Course EducationJanuary 29, 2010 Related28 Graduate from CSI Computer Repairs Course Related28 Graduate from CSI Computer Repairs Coursecenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of National Security, Major Richard Reece, has charged graduates of a course under the Community Security Initiative (CSI) to “prove to the world that all you needed was an opportunity to succeed”.He told the 28 graduates during a ceremony, Thursday (January 28), at the Excelsior Community College, where the computer repairs course was delivered, that the skill they have been taught will allow them to be masters of their own destinies.The course comprised learning fundamentals of electronics, PC upgrades and repairs, basic mathematics, communication, customer service, literacy, numeracy and entrepreneurial skills.Classes ran from June to July, however, Major Reece said the students elected to return for make-up classes and self-development seminars.“The 28 students were not from uptown, an indication that bright sparks and strong ambition are just about everywhere, they just needed to be harnessed,” he said. The class comprised 24 men and 4 women from the communities of Highlight View, Matthew’s Lane and March Pen Road.The aims of the programme were to provide participants with a marketable skill, as well as help them to be able to go back to their communities and share their skills.Major Reece noted that, as part of the thrust to ensure the knowledge is transferred, the Ministry would be establishing computer laboratories in their communities. One of the laboratories has already been completed in Matthew’s Lane.Guest Speaker at the graduation, Director of Students Expressing Truth, Kevin Wallen, charged the graduates not to take what they have accomplished lightly.“When you get your (certificates) and you go home, frame them and put them on your wall with pride and let it be a reminder that you have done something, you have accomplished something, and let it be a stepping stone for the next thing you want to accomplish,” he exhorted.He also encouraged them not to allow the negative comments of others to affect them.“Until you learn to stop reacting to the actions and the words of others, is when you truly start to grow because the external forces will destroy you,” he added.Delivering the valedictory address, Marvin Stephenson, said the graduates were aware of the opportunity given to them and that they would try their best to empower their communities.CSI is a social intervention programme within the Ministry of National Security, which is funded by the Department for International Development (DFID). Advertisementslast_img read more

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Spectrum auction design: making money out of thin air

first_imgSpectrum auction design: making money out of thin air Market design is playing an increasingly important role globally in creating new forms of value and carving out new markets such as spectrum auctions, says UNSW Business School.There have been significant advances in the theory and practice of market design in recent years, which have created billions of dollars’ worth of value globally through the creation of new markets as well as the optimisation of existing markets.Spectrum auction design is a classic example of market design, says Dr Jacob Goeree, a leading figure globally in practical market design and Scientia Professor in the School of Economics at UNSW Business School.Prior to the introduction of spectrum auctions, governments commonly gave away specific bands of the electromagnetic spectrum to the likes of telecommunications companies – but spectrum auctions have become one of the most lucrative auction markets in the modern world.“Spectrum auction design is an important subfield of market design,” says Prof. Goeree, who has a long track record in this field.Today, the auctions which raise the most revenue for governments around the world are often spectrum auctions, and US government auctions of the electromagnetic spectrum have generated more than US$100 billion (A$135 billion) to date.“Many were shocked – in a positive manner – that you could actually make money out of thin air,” says Prof. Goeree, who also serves as Director of UNSW Business School’s AGORA Centre for Market Design – which is very active in the field of spectrum auction design.Prof. Goeree has advised governments worldwide about the design of spectrum auctions, including in the US, Canada, the Netherlands and Australia.He has also written many scholarly articles on spectrum auction design and co-edited the Handbook of Spectrum Auction Design which contains contributions from many leading scholars.Nobel Prize-winning achievementsThe importance of market design has also been recognised by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, with numerous Nobel Prizes being awarded for advancements in market design.The most recent example is this year’s Nobel Prize in economic sciences, in which Stanford Economics Professors Paul Milgrom and Robert Wilson were recognised for improvements to auction theory and inventions of new auction formats.“Their work is a great example of market design,” says Prof. Goeree.“The Nobel committee has shown impeccable taste by awarding this year’s prize to both Milgrom and Wilson.“It’s an excellent choice – and maybe somewhat overdue. Milgrom is the leading theorist of our times and Wilson has been enormously influential in the field.“Three of Wilson’s students are Nobel Laureates, and now he deservedly is one himself – he is the patriarch of a Nobel family.”To win this year’s Nobel Prize in economic sciences, Profs. Milgrom (a Fellow of AGORA) and Wilson studied how auctions work and designed new auction formats for goods and services that are difficult to sell in a traditional way.Specifically, Prof. Milgrom showed that an auction generates more revenue for the seller when bidders can learn about each other’s estimated values during the bidding process.Prof. Goeree was also cited multiple times in the Nobel Prize Committee paper that describes the achievements of Profs. Milgrom and Wilson.AGORA: where market design minds come togetherThe AGORA Centre for Market Design draws on the expertise of Australian and international researchers from a wide range of disciplines – including game theory, experimental economics, computer science and operations research – to solve major market problems.The centre tackles real-word issues such as how to design pollution permits for greenhouse gas initiatives, alternatives to standard voting, how best to trade water rights and even award-winning models for selling fishing rights at state government levels.More recently, AGORA has advised the Australian Communications and Media Authority about the design of the upcoming 850-900 MHz auction.Prof. Goeree explains that the concept of market design is not new, but innovations around its application certainly are.“For example, the 2012 Nobel Prize in economic sciences was also for market design and it concerned the matching of organ donors to patients. This work was done by Stanford Professor Alvin Roth (also an AGORA Fellow).”Then there is the creation of auctions and markets for public resources (like spectrums) but there are many others.“Basically, any ‘institution’ – by which I mean a set of rules under which self-interested and privately informed individuals interact – falls within the domain of market design,” says Prof. Goeree.He is currently working with AGORA Postdoctoral Fellow Bernardo García-Pola on a project to improve voting systems that factor in the intensities with which voters care about a particular issue.For more information read How market design is transforming the role of economists into engineers at UNSW Business School’s BusinessThink. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:auction, Australia, Australian, business, communications, fishing, Government, Netherlands, pollution, Professor, project, research, resources, science, students, university, University of New South Wales, UNSWlast_img read more

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Digital Literacy Training for Seniors wins international award

first_imgDigital Literacy Training for Seniors wins international award Hon Dr Ayesha Verrall Work to break down digital barriers faced by older New Zealanders, has received international recognition.The Office for Seniors Digital Literacy Training for Seniors programme has won the education category in the 2021 IDC Smart City Asia Pacific Awards, which are in their seventh year.Winners are decided through a rigorous six-stage benchmarking framework, analysing how they’re leveraging technology to improve city operations and better serve people.This year there was a lot of competition, with more than 250 public nominations and more than 140,000 public votes in the 14 categories.The Digital Literacy Training for Seniors programme is delivered by Digital Inclusion Alliance Aotearoa and the 20/20 Trust, and was funded through the 2019 Wellbeing Budget. It has been helping older people from a diverse range of backgrounds develop skills for the digital world.Minister for Seniors Dr Ayesha Verrall was delighted to hear the project had won.“It’s great to see the Digital Literacy Training for Seniors programme, and the providers involved, recognised internationally alongside other important projects,” said Ayesha Verrall.“Our modern society is dependent on technology, even more so over the last year because of COVID-19. But sadly some older people are digitally excluded.“The training began last year, and we are seeing huge changes in students’ abilities.“It’s a really exciting opportunity for older people to feel more confident using the internet, keep in touch with friends and family, and be able to handle future technology changes.“I would like to congratulate the Office for Seniors, Digital Inclusion Alliance Aotearoa, and the 20/20 Trust for their win, and encourage any older people who want to learn more about using technology to try this award-winning programme,” said Ayesha Verrall. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Asia, covid-19, digital, education, Family, Government, Internet, Minister, New Zealand, older people, pacific, project, Seniors, Society, students, technology, wellbeinglast_img read more

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