Winners and losers: Who had a good week — and who didn’t

first_img Ed Silverman About the Author Reprints GET STARTED Alex Hogan/STAT Everyone loves a winner, but who are they? Let us help you figure it out. Each Friday, we will provide a quick rundown of individuals or companies that accomplished something worth noting. But to be fair, we will also point out those who, well, had a rough time. And if you have a nomination, send us a note. We would not want anyone to feel left out, even the losers.WinnersBristol-Myers Squibb: Win some, lose some. Just a few days after disclosing it will not seek accelerated approval for a combination of its Opdivo and Yervoy immunotherapies, the drug maker will get $625 million from Merck. Why? Bristol-Myers and its Opdivo partner, Ono Pharmaceutical, claimed Merck’s Keytruda infringed on their own PD-1 patents underpinning their drug. Merck will also pay royalties on global Keytruda sales over the next decade. This is not going to compensate for concerns that Bristol-Myers is falling behind Merck in immunotherapies, but it’s better than nothing. What’s included? Log In | Learn More STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Pharmalot Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTEDcenter_img What is it? Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. @Pharmalot Winners and losers: Who had a good week — and who didn’t By Ed Silverman Jan. 27, 2017 Reprints [email protected] Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Tags FDAfinancepharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

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Astronauts need nutrition on longer space flights. One potential source? Their urine

first_img NASA’s lab rat: What astronaut Scott Kelly’s year in space can teach us Newsletters Sign up for Morning Rounds Your daily dose of news in health and medicine. You can’t get fresh salmon in space, but astronauts may one day be able to get the vital nutrients the fish provide — by recycling their urine and exhaled breaths.Chemical engineers at Clemson University are bioengineering yeast to use human urine and breath to make omega-3 fatty acids, the vitamins humans need for heart, eye, and brain health that are found in fish such as salmon. It’s still in the early stages — and there are some significant hurdles to clear — but the process could one day be used to simultaneously recycle waste and keep astronauts healthy on multiyear space missions. The researchers will present their results Tuesday at the American Chemical Society’s annual meeting.Mark Blenner, a biomolecular engineer at Clemson, received funding from NASA in 2015 for his research on Yarrowia lipolytica, a cousin of baker’s yeast that is good at making and storing large amounts of fatty acids and lipids.advertisement NASA HealthAstronauts need nutrition on longer space flights. One potential source? Their urine Related: Leave this field empty if you’re human: “The idea of recycling human waste in space is very critical and very important,” said Dongming Xie, a biochemical engineer at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell, who wasn’t involved in the research. Xie added that to live in space for years, humans have to figure out how to turn a spaceship into a “small Earth” by creating a sustainable, closed-loop system.But Xie, who worked on a similar process involving the same yeast at DuPont, also pointed out that Blenner and his team have some hurdles to clear: They have to increase their omega-3 outputs and process the acids to make them fit for human consumption. Yeast also require oxygen to grow — which could be problematic on a space mission in which oxygen is limited.Blenner and his team are working to tackle those issues as they modify the system to make it space-ready.If that happens, astronauts in the future could find themselves launching into space with a healthy supply of yeast riding shotgun. The space agency was seeking ways to allow astronauts to spend more time in space on far-off missions. Blenner and his team borrowed genes from algae and phytoplankton, tiny marine organisms that excel at making omega-3s. They inserted those genes into yeast DNA, successfully engineering the yeast to produce some of the more important omega-3s for human health. Now, they’re tinkering with the yeast to get them to produce larger, more useful quantities of omega-3s.advertisementcenter_img To churn out omega-3s, yeast require a constant stream of nitrogen and carbon, which are readily available on Earth, but hard to come by on a space shuttle. That forced Blenner and his colleagues to think more creatively.“You have to figure out, how do you basically start to recycle all the things you’ve brought with you for other needs?” he said.Their answer? Astronaut waste. Specifically, urine and the carbon dioxide exhaled with every breath. In a manuscript submitted for publication, the team showed that their yeast grew better on urea from human urine than on other nitrogen sources like ammonium salt.Securing a simple carbon source for the yeast has proven more challenging, since yeast can’t extract carbon directly from carbon dioxide. Right now, Blenner and his team are working with cyanobacteria, photosynthesizing bacteria that turn carbon dioxide into carbon-rich sugars.There are other critical details to work out — Blenner and his colleagues still need to predict how the yeast will behave in the low-gravity, high-radiation space environment, which they’ll test by replicating conditions on a space station. They’ll also have to make the system light enough to send into space and simple enough for astronauts to fix if something goes wrong.If it works, the system could be a game changer for long-term space travel. If the approach could be expanded beyond omega-3s, it could offer astronauts a potential way to produce their own vitamins and medications, some of which degrade quickly and can’t be stored for multiyear missions.Others in the field say it’s an interesting approach to solving a difficult problem. By Catherine Caruso Aug. 22, 2017 Reprints Please enter a valid email address. Privacy Policy “I like to say they’re a lot like I am, so they eat too much, and they want to store that as fat for later,” Blenner said. Tags nutritionresearchlast_img read more

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A scrappy upstart in the pain pill business takes on mighty Purdue Pharma

first_img Log In | Learn More What’s included? Pharma Alex Hogan/STAT A scrappy upstart in the pain pill business takes on mighty Purdue Pharma Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED CANTON, Mass. — Collegium Pharmaceutical, the scrappy upstart taking on the mighty opioid maker Purdue Pharma, is having a moment.The company recently convinced Cigna, Humana, Navitus, and top health insurers in Florida and Pennsylvania to cover only its product Xtampza — and not Purdue’s infamous OxyContin — for most patients prescribed the long-acting opioid known to scientists as oxycodone. Earlier this month came another win: The Food and Drug Administration agreed to let Collegium update Xtampza’s label to describe data demonstrating that the capsules are harder than OxyContin to abuse when crushed. What is it? GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. By Rebecca Robbins Nov. 22, 2017 Reprints Tags insuranceopioidspainpharmaceuticalspolicylast_img read more

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Allergan to eliminate 1,400 positions as generic competition looms

first_img What’s included? Allergan to eliminate 1,400 positions as generic competition looms STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. @Pharmalot Allergan CEO Brent Saunders Richard Drew/AP Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Tags financepharmaceuticalsSTAT+ What is it? About the Author Reprintscenter_img Log In | Learn More Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Making good on a recent promise, Allergan (AGN) disclosed plans to cut 1,000 existing jobs as the company prepares to face generic competition, especially for its second-biggest medicine, the Restasis eye treatment.The job cuts, which also involve eliminating 400 open positions, are expected to reduce expenses between $300 million and $400 million this year, according to a regulatory filing made on Wednesday. Allergan employs about 18,000 people. Other steps, such as closing buildings, may also occur. Pharmalot GET STARTED [email protected] By Ed Silverman Jan. 3, 2018 Reprints Ed Silvermanlast_img read more

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At 88, this doctor won’t give up on a long-ignored treatment for strokes and heart attacks

first_img NewslettersSign up for The Readout Your daily guide to what’s happening in biotech. Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. Privacy Policy In the LabAt 88, this doctor won’t give up on a long-ignored treatment for strokes and heart attacks Related: STAT+: Exclusive analysis of biopharma, health policy, and the life sciences. Privacy Policy @kweintraub About the Author Reprints He’s a professor at Harvard Medical School, but in many ways, Dr. Victor Gurewich is an outsider.His research is funded by a small family foundation, and he hasn’t tried for a federal grant in decades. He’s a primary care doctor whose work tramples on the terrain of cardiologists and neurologists.So it’s perhaps not surprising that, more than 20 years after figuring out a combination therapy that he believes is a safer, more effective way to treat heart attacks and strokes, he’s had little success getting anyone to listen.advertisement “It’s a nifty idea. Who knows, maybe it’s a great idea.” The story begins in 1980, when Gurewich discovered a precursor to an enzyme, called urokinase plasminogen activator.We can survive cuts and bruises without bleeding to death because of our blood’s ability to form clots. The body also has a compensatory clot-busting system to dissolve clots that form inside blood vessels: tPA is part of that natural system; urokinase is, too.Urokinase was already being used as a clot-buster in people with clots in their lungs, but it sometimes led to brain bleeds, because it didn’t target just the clot.Gurewich’s urokinase precursor was less likely to lead to brain bleeds, because it was clot-specific, but when he published that finding, it had no impact. William Campbell loves worms. And they won him a Nobel Prize Although he hadn’t yet met Gurewich, del Zoppo was a big fan of urokinase in those days, and of the idea that drugs could be used within a few hours of a stroke to help the brain recover. He helped lead clinical trials of tPA, which proved more popular than urokinase, in part because it could be delivered more easily. Urokinase was injected into an artery in the thigh, while the doctor watched for the clot to dissolve. With tPA, doctors simply had to add a standard dose to a patient’s IV drip “and hope for the best,” said Mayer, of Henry Ford.Although tPA failed at least half the time, and could have devastating side effects, tPA became the standard of care, with the entire emergency care system redesigned to make sure stroke patients could receive it quickly enough, del Zoppo said.Gurewich was still convinced he had a better approach, so he went back to his lab, hoping to generate results that couldn’t be ignored.Gurewich points to data that show the efficacy of his combination drug treatment, as compared with tPA, in heart attack patients. Kayana Szymczak for STATGurewich has always loved the satisfaction of research.“As a boy, I was always taking things apart,” he said, laughing at his limited success at putting mechanical toys and other things back together. “It is fun to think about how something works.”He was 6 when his family fled Hitler’s Berlin. Gurewich was raised mostly in London and New York, where several German Nobel laureates were regular guests of his doctor father’s.He came to Boston in the late 1950s for medical school at Harvard, where a mentor encouraged him to pursue his curiosity and take up research projects on the side. It was an unusual activity for a practicing doctor at the time. Ever since, he’s balanced a half-time medical practice — he still sees patients four half-days a week, at Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge — and research.“I’m interested in blood vessels,” he said. People think of heart disease as occurring in the heart, but, really, most of the action happens in the coronary blood vessels, he said. Several heart and stroke specialists told STAT they knew nothing about Gurewich’s work, or else they dismissed his experimental therapy as outmoded.Others said he should keep plugging away to see whether his drug combination can be shown safe and effective in patients. “It’s a nifty idea. Who knows, maybe it’s a great idea,” said Stephan A. Mayer, chairman of neurology for the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit.Twenty-three years ago, Gurewich published a clinical trial in heart attack patients, showing his idea of combining two medications to break up blood clots had merit. But the company that ran the study was sold, and the buyer shut down its cardiology division. Since then, as he’s labored to get financial backing, another drug became the standard of care in stroke, while clot-busting drugs were abandoned as a treatment for heart attacks.“It’s just a remarkable story,” said Annalisa Jenkins, a British doctor and biotech executive who serves on the TSI board. She signed on, she said, because she believes in the science and wants to help the company succeed. She also believes in Gurewich.“I just love him to bits,” she said. “His whole life has been unraveling this [medical] pathway. … He’s not in it for the commercial success. It’s part of his legacy.”Built-in bookshelves in Gurewick’s office are lined with his lab notebooks, meticulously labeled and dating back to 1963. Kayana Szymczak for STATEnd up in a hospital today with a heart attack, and you’re likely to be rushed in for an emergency angioplasty. An interventional cardiologist will thread a catheter through your arteries until reaching the site of the blockage in your heart that caused the attack. By inflating a tiny balloon, the doctor will push the clot out of the way, allowing blood to flow through again.The faster the better, but many patients get to the hospital after the first few hours, when most of the damage happens.If, instead, you have a type of stroke caused by a similar blockage in the blood vessels of the brain, speed is also essential. A doctor may perform surgery to break up clots in larger vessels, but that procedure is still too risky in smaller ones. In those cases, you might receive a drug called tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA. If given within 4 1/2 hours after a stroke begins, the medication can help dissolve the clot, restore blood flow, and reduce brain damage. But tPA can also cause seizures and fatal brain bleeds, which makes some doctors reluctant to use it.Gurewich believes his treatment approach could solve both problems: The medications could quickly open up blocked vessels, providing stroke patients effective treatment at lower risk, and giving heart attack patients more time to get an angioplasty or — in areas or countries where the procedure is too expensive or readily available — an effective alternative.He has the type of scientific data that usually convinces medical minds to run a large clinical trial in the hopes of winning FDA approval of their drug. But Gurewich often feels like he’s tilting at windmills.“It’s all pretty obvious,” Gurewich said of his approach, because that’s how clots are naturally dissolved in the body. “What’s not so obvious is why it’s ignored.” Stephan A. Mayer, chairman of neurology for the Henry Ford Health System Related: Please enter a valid email address. By Karen Weintraub April 6, 2018 Reprints Brain organoids as repair kits for stroke damage inch closer to reality Gurewich is modest about his role in this discovery. “We didn’t invent anything,” he said. “We just figured out how it works, which is sometimes all it takes.”But it would take more than that.A European pharmaceutical company had licensed Gurewich’s form of pro-UK and funded the 1995 trial, after seeing his earlier, promising results. But the company was sold to another, which had different priorities and gave Gurewich back the license.He tried to find another company to support his research, but by the late 1990s and early 2000s, the field was focused on getting tPA into patients fast enough.Other people were tinkering with different drugs in this class, called thrombolytics. Some of these drugs fared well in mid-sized trials, but none made it all the way to market.Gurewich refused to give up. He set out to improve pro-UK’s main weakness: In the body, it quickly converted to urokinase and caused bleeding.He started TSI in 2006 to fund the work, and eventually, he came up with a modified version of pro-UK that converted to urokinase more slowly, and therefore was safer.By that point, though, the mixed results from tPA had so discredited the whole idea of such thrombolytic drugs in treating heart attacks that cardiologists dismiss the entire drug category out of hand. “We’ve moved away from thrombolytics for a long time now,” Robert Yeh, an interventional cardiologist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, said via email. Heart attacks are instead treated with angioplasty. Leave this field empty if you’re human: In the early 1980s, when his research was federally funded, Gurewich figured out that urokinase and tPA functioned as a team in the body. But he didn’t understand how the process worked.One night, he woke up thinking about the problem. “It killed the rest of the night,” he said. But by first light, he had an idea: What if tPA worked like the starter motor that turns on a car, and urokinase was the gasoline that ran it?Back in his lab, he proved at least experimentally that he was right. When a clot forms, tPA in the bloodstream is quickly recruited to the site to begin dissolving it. But too much of a clot-buster could lead to bleeds, so once the process is sparked, the body rapidly clears out tPA. Urokinase comes along, carried on the surface of platelets and certain white blood cells, to finish the job.The mistake that everyone, including him, had made, Gurewich realized, was that they had treated patients with just one drug or the other. They needed both.One early study had found that tPA reopens blockages in about 45 percent of heart attack patients, but also leads to death in about 6 percent of them. In a 1995 clinical trial, Gurewich showed that the combination of tPA plus his urokinase precursor, called pro-UK, could open 82 percent of blockages. One out of his 101 patients died in the hospital — a death rate of just 1 percent. The trial was not a gold-standard randomized trial, however; it didn’t compare tPA head to head with the combination therapy. Please enter a valid email address. Now at age 88, Gurewich is still trying to convince his medical peers that he’s right, and a tiny company he started in 2006 is about to launch a clinical trial in Europe that he hopes will prove it.“I’m stubborn. I don’t give up,” he said during an interview in the modest Cambridge, Mass., offices of Thrombolytic Science International, where the built-in bookshelves are lined with his lab notebooks, meticulously hand-labeled and dating back to 1963. His long struggle to be heard offers insight into how promising research ideas sometimes fail to take hold — even in the face of favorable evidence — said Gregory del Zoppo, a University of Washington expert on stroke treatment who saw enough promise in Gurewich’s data to join the company’s clinical advisory board.   advertisement Dr. Victor Gurewich at his office in Cambridge, Mass. Kayana Szymczak for STAT Karen Weintraub Karen Weintraub is an independenthealth/sciencejournalist, journalism teacher, and bookauthor. Leave this field empty if you’re human: tPA is still considered valuable for stroke patients, though as many as 30 percent of patients who might benefit don’t receive it — at least in part, according to a recent New York Times story, because their doctors are dubious of its benefits.Gurewich feels strongly that giving tPA by itself is a bad idea. “It’s quite remarkable that they’re still using tPA alone,” he said. “It’s a bit of a scandal. More than a bit.”Now, Gurewich and TSI’s staff of one are poised to start a clinical trial in 100 stroke patients in the Netherlands in June, with the $1 million to $2 million cost picked up by the same private foundation that has kept the company going all these years. If Jenkins can help the company raise $5 million to 10 million in the next few months, it will launch a second trial in heart attack patients in London.Gurewich’s hope is that the clinical trials will finally prove to the world that his one-two punch can safely knock out clots in the heart and the brain. A successful pilot trial should be enough to convince a major pharmaceutical company to invest in the idea, buy up TSI, and conduct the larger, more expensive trials that would be needed to bring it to market, Jenkins said.Although stroke specialists are moving away from tPA now, in favor of surgery, Dr. David Liebeskind, a professor of neurology at the University of California, Los Angeles, said the right drug could still catch the field’s attention. To displace tPA, a new drug would have to be at least as safe, effective, and easy to use, he said. Cheaper would help, too. The price of tPA has recently rocketed up from about $2,000 to $8,700 per vial, he said.Gurewich remains perennially optimistic.“Now there’s a hope we really will get this on the market and used,” he said. Tags cardiologyneurologyresearchlast_img read more

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Most emergency docs report shortages of critical medicines, and the problem is ‘getting worse’

first_imgPharmalot [email protected] What is it? Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Log In | Learn More Most emergency docs report shortages of critical medicines, and the problem is ‘getting worse’ As medicine shortages worsen around the country, nine out of 10 emergency doctors say they have lacked a critical treatment this month, and 69 percent reported that shortages have increased “a lot” over the past year, according to a new survey.At the same time, 43 percent said that anywhere from six to 10 medicines were in short supply recently and nearly every doctor — 97 percent — was forced to use an alternative because of shortages. Still worse, 36 percent of the physicians reported patient outcomes were worse, including instances of harm. GET STARTEDcenter_img About the Author Reprints Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. @Pharmalot Ed Silverman Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED What’s included? By Ed Silverman May 22, 2018 Reprints Tags hospitalsopioidspharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

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SEC charges a biotech billionaire with pump-and-dump fraud

first_img Philip Frost (second from right) once served as chairman of Teva. Richard Drew/AP What is it? Damian Garde Log In | Learn More @damiangarde STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED National Biotech Reporter Damian covers biotech, is a co-writer of The Readout newsletter, and a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. GET STARTED What’s included?center_img SEC charges a biotech billionaire with pump-and-dump fraud Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. About the Author Reprints By Damian Garde Sept. 7, 2018 Reprints [email protected] Biotech Philip Frost, a longtime biotech billionaire, was accused Friday of taking part in a pump-and-dump stock scheme that bilked investors out of $27 million.The Securities and Exchange Commission charged Frost and nine others in connection with what it described as a scheme to buy up shares in penny-stock biotechs, illegally promote the companies online, and then sell their shares before the bottom fell out. Tags biotechnologyfinancelast_img read more

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World Health Organization advisers call for registry of studies on human genome editing

first_img A World Health Organization advisory committee on editing human DNA will ask the United Nations agency to establish a global registry of all such research, recommend that editors of scientific journals not publish any unregistered studies, and ask science funders to require that their grantees register their studies, committee co-chair Dr. Margaret Hamburg told reporters on Tuesday.The registry would include studies that edit the DNA of eggs, sperm, and early embryos, called germline editing, and those that edit adult cells for the purpose of curing disease, which is much less controversial and is the focus of all genome-editing companies. Senior Writer, Science and Discovery (1956-2021) Sharon covered science and discovery. About the Author Reprints By Sharon Begley March 19, 2019 Reprints World Health Organization advisers call for registry of studies on human genome editing [email protected] Log In | Learn More @sxbegle Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.center_img Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED What’s included? Dr. Margaret Hamburg, co-chair of WHO advisory committee on editing human DNA. Drew Angerer for STAT GET STARTED What is it? Sharon Begley In the Lab Tags CRISPRgeneticsgovernment agencieslast_img read more

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Christi Shaw, inspired by her sister’s cancer, named CEO of Kite Pharma, Gilead’s anti-cancer unit

first_imgBiotech Senior Writer, Medicine, Editorial Director of Events Matthew covers medical innovation — both its promise and its perils. Log In | Learn More By Matthew Herper July 11, 2019 Reprints [email protected] Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the biotech sector — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Christi Shaw, inspired by her sister’s cancer, named CEO of Kite Pharma, Gilead’s anti-cancer unit Christi Shaw, until Thursday morning the executive in charge of Eli Lilly’s drug division, will become the CEO of Kite Pharma, the unit of biotechnology giant Gilead that is focused on treatments that genetically engineer patients’ white blood cells to attack cancer.Shaw said she was inspired to take the job because that type of treatment, known as CAR-T, is what she wants to focus on. What’s included?center_img @matthewherper STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. About the Author Reprints Kite Pharma What is it? GET STARTED Matthew Herper Tags biotechnologycancerlast_img read more

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Former Athenahealth CEO Jonathan Bush joins health care startup

first_img GET STARTED Former Athenahealth CEO Jonathan Bush joins health care startup Health Tech For Jonathan Bush, there is life after Athenahealth.The outspoken former chief executive of the Watertown, Mass., company has landed a new gig as executive chairman of the Boston startup Firefly Health, which aims to provide primary care for patients through an app as well as clinic and employer visits. Unlock this article — and get additional analysis of the technologies disrupting health care — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED About the Author Reprints Jon Chesto — Boston Globe What is it? [email protected] Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Athenahealth CEO Jonathan Bush (right) talks with Steve Clemons of The Atlantic in 2018. What’s included? Log In | Learn More By Jon Chesto — Boston Globe Sept. 16, 2019 Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. @jonchesto Tags BostonHealth ITSTAT+last_img read more

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