Update on Extreme Weather Impact on Fish Mortalities

first_imgFisheries and Aquaculture staff have completed their initial visits to aquaculture sites in Nova Scotia. Preliminary results suggest extreme cold weather is to blame for the fish mortalities. The numbers of fish lost is not yet known. The losses include salmon and trout in several locations. The dead fish are being properly removed and disposed of. The department was informed that in two cases, net pens were damaged and dead fish were released. The nets have since been repaired and there is no evidence live fished escaped. “This rare act of nature is very unfortunate. This is one of the coldest winters we’ve experienced,” said Fisheries and Aquaculture Minister Keith Colwell. “Our department will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure everything that can be done is being done.”last_img read more

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Loblaw recalls No Name brand chicken burgers over salmonella fears

first_imgBRAMPTON, Ont. – Loblaw Companies Ltd. is recalling certain packages of No Name brand chicken burgers out of what the retailer calls “an abundance of caution.”The company says the burgers, which have a best before date of Feb. 6, 2019, may pose a risk of salmonella if they aren’t prepared properly.The products were sold across the country at locations under the Loblaws, Maxi, Extra Foods and Independent brands, among others.Loblaw says all affected products have been removed from store shelves, and customers can return them for a full refund.Health Canada says salmonella is the leading cause of bacterial foodborne illness in the country, with more than 200,000 cases in 2015 alone.The agency advises consumers to cook frozen, raw-breaded chicken according to the package instructions, and to the correct internal temperature.last_img read more

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UN agency seeks additional 56 million to repair damage in occupied Palestinian

The UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) released the supplementary $55.7 million appeal in Geneva, saying it was “over and above” the agency’s $117 million emergency request for this year.According to Rene Aquarone, Chief of the UNRWA Liaison Office in Geneva, the amount was needed for shelter repair, relief and social systems, infrastructure rehabilitation, additional food aid in addition to what was already foreseen in the emergency appeal, education, and employment generation.Employment generation was important because as the occupied territories went further into this crisis, the possibilities and the coping mechanisms of Palestinians had eroded basically to non-existence, Mr. Aquarone said at a press briefing.Pointing to Israel’s re-occupation of some of the territories in the last few days, Mr. Aquarone said UNRWA felt that it was seeing signs of a more long-term re-occupation around Bethlehem and other areas. The Agency had been previously able to access most of the re-occupied areas and had provided immediate humanitarian needs, including food and medical supplies, but many of these zones were now closed.In response to a question about the effects of the new wall that Israel was building, Mr. Aquarone said that it was a “very visible, concrete thing” but in terms of the Palestinian refugees, it did not make very much difference to them because they were just not being allowed to circulate. read more

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To escape gangs and poverty Central American children making risky journey to

Many of the adults and some of the children apprehended at the US border are deported in expedited proceedings, women and young children spend weeks, and at times months in detention, while unaccompanied children may face years of uncertainty as their cases go before immigration courts, the report noted.If deported, some of them could be killed or raped by the gangs they had sought to escape in the first place, and all these children need protection every step of the way – at home, along the journey and at their destination, the report stressed.Data shows unaccompanied children who do not have an attorney in US immigration hearings – 40 per cent – are more likely to be deported than those who do. In recent cases, 40 per cent of unrepresented children were ordered deported, as compared to 3 per cent for represented children.UNICEF warns of the “extremely dangerous journey” for Central America’s children as they seek refuge. Credit: UN News CentreIn the first six months of 2014, more than 44,500 unaccompanied children were apprehended at the US border; the number dropped to almost 18,500 in the same period in 2015 and rose again this year to almost 26,000 by June, the report said.Further, the report noted that thousands never make it as far as the US border. In the first six months of 2016, more than 16,000 refugee and migrant children from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras were apprehended in Mexico. In addition, hundreds of refugees and migrants die every year in the harsh environment along the Mexico-US border. Many more are missing and are feared to have been kidnapped, trafficked or murdered.UNICEF said that detention of children on the basis of their migration status should be prevented. Children also should have full access to healthcare and other services and should be allowed to live with their families whenever possible. In the first six months of 2016, almost 26,000 unaccompanied children and close to 29,700 people travelling as a family – mostly mothers and young children – were apprehended at the US border, according to the report, Broken Dreams: Central American Children’s Dangerous Journey to the United States. “It is heart-rending to think of these children – most of them teenagers, but some even younger – making the gruelling and extremely dangerous journey in search of safety and a better life. This flow of young refugees and migrants highlights the critical importance of tackling the violence and socio-economic conditions in their countries of origin,” said UNICEF’s Deputy Executive Director, Justin Forsyth, in a press release.The report was released ahead of the UN Summit on Addressing Large Movements of Refugees and Migrants, on 19 September at UN Headquarters, in New York, as well as a summit on the global refugee crisis, hosted by US President Barack Obama during the high-level segment of the 71st session of the UN General Assembly on 20 September.According to the report, most of the apprehended people are from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, which have some of the world’s highest murder rates. They seek to get away from brutal gangs that target them or poverty and exclusion that deprive them of education and hope. Many also travel north to reunify with their families. Migrant minors eat lunch in Guatemalan shelter, Nuestras Raices, (Our Roots) after being deported from Mexico. They were held in Chiapas, Mexico, on a dangerous journey to the United States. 4 July 2016. Photo: UNICEF/Daniele Volpe Migrant Routes from Central America to the United States, 2016Together with its partners, UNICEF is working to address the causes of migration by supporting the efforts of governments to improve children’s lives and address communal and criminal violence in countries of origin.UNICEF also works to strengthen services that reduce the vulnerability of children to violence, with a strong focus on education and health. It also advocates for the protection of children’s rights throughout their journey, and for governments to provide assistance to returnee children.“We must remember that children, whatever their status, are first and foremost children. We have a duty to keep them safe in a healthy and nurturing environment,” Mr. Forsyth said. read more

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RGIII Fined 10000 by NFL For Pregame Gear

Photo by The Associated Press.Robert Griffin III, who was fined by the Nike-sponsored NFL last season for wearing Adidas during a post-game press conference, was pinched for $10,000 by the league for wearing unauthorized apparel before Monday night’s preseason game against the Pittsburgh Steelers, a league official confirmed Thursday.A T-shirt  bearing the words “Operation Patience” on it, worn before the game in which he did not play, did not conform with the NFL’s uniform rules – thus the fine, however petty.Griffin, coming off a torn ACL, practiced with and against the first team Wednesday–his first full practice since last season. Griffin took 49 snaps against the scout team defense last week.“I’m getting the team reps, and that’s what I wanted, and that’s what the team needed me to be out there doing,” said Griffin, who has yet to play in the preseason and remains in question for the team’s regular-season opener. “I feel good. I am confident coach (Mike Shanahan) easing me in has helped, and giving me the extra reps has helped now. My eyes are set on Philly.”After an examination before the Redskins played Pittsburgh, Griffin said Dr. James Andrews told him that his leg looked strong and his movement was good. Andrews’ message: Stay the course. read more

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Gardaí should be able to quash penalty points for humanitarian reasons

first_imgAN INTERNAL GARDA investigation into the role of senior Gardaí in the quashing of penalty points has recommended that ‘humanitarian grounds’ should be included as a reason for cancelling points.The report by the Garda Professional Standards Unit into the penalty points controversy says that the current list of reasons for cancelling points is not up to date.The GPSU report also recommends that Superintendents should be able to search  the penalty points computer system for offenders to see if they have had points cancelled already to look for any suspicious patterns of behaviour, as, the report suggests, “an offender could request cancellations in a number of district areas, while using the same circumstances to support their cancellation request.”It says that only senior Gardaí should be given the authority to cancel points, noting that due to an anamoly in the Garda PULSE computer system, any Garda could cancel points for ten months between September 2009 and July 2010. After that only Inspectors or higher ranks were able to do so.The report into the processes behind the cancellation of points was published at the same time as a separate report by the Assistant Garda Commissioner into the controversy around whether some Gardaí broke the rules in cancelling penalty points.The report was carried out by seven people within the Garda Professional Standards Unit, including five senior Gardaí. The GPSU was set up in 2006 to carry out investigations into An Garda Síochána upon the request of the Garda Commissioner.Read: Three ‘possible breaches’ identified in penalty points report >last_img read more

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Rescue boats carrying 630 migrants refused entry in Italy begin arriving in

first_img Migrants descend the Italian coast guard vessel Dattilo. Image: Alberto Saiz/PA Images Jun 17th 2018, 7:36 AM Share139 Tweet Email THE 630 MIGRANTS whose rescue sparked a major migration row in Europe began disembarking in Spain, after a turbulent week that saw Italy turn away the Aquarius ship.The first of three ships transporting the group, an Italian coast guard vessel called the Datillo, pulled into Valencia harbour just before 6:30 am with 274 migrants on board, according to the Red Cross.Applause could be heard coming from the ship as it docked.Medical staff wearing white overalls, gloves and masks then boarded the boat to carry out first medical checks as a police helicopter flew overhead.The other migrants will arrive on an Italian navy ship, the Orione, and the Aquarius itself by noon, regional authorities said.The migrants, mainly from Africa, will be welcomed by a team of more than 2,000 people, including 1,000 Red Cross volunteers and 470 translators.Dozens of reporters who were on hand to cover their arrival were kept at a distance and no top government officials were expected at the port.High waves and winds forced the convoy to take a detour on their 1,500-kilometre voyage to Spain. Their arrival will mark the end of a week-long odyssey in the Mediterranean Sea.A huge banner was earlier put up at the port saying “Welcome home” in various languages including Catalan, the local language, and Arabic.“People are coming forward for everything: serving as translators, providing accommodation,” said Johnson Tamayo, a 51-year-old artist and Red Cross volunteer. Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Migrants descend the Italian coast guard vessel Dattilo. By AFP Sunday 17 Jun 2018, 7:36 AM Rescue boats carrying 630 migrants refused entry in Italy begin arriving in Spain The Aquarius has caused a major diplomatic row over European immigration policy. Short URL #LIVE from #Aquarius: as we approach Spain, people have been praying and giving thanks to their God for delivering them safely to a new life. pic.twitter.com/phAoIWrRvg— Anelise Borges (@AnneliseBorges) June 16, 2018 Source: Anelise Borges/Twitter 40 Comments 14,853 Views http://jrnl.ie/4075267 Image: Alberto Saiz/PA Images The passengers are made up of 450 adult men and 80 women — including at least seven pregnant women — as well as 11 under-13s and 89 adolescents, according to figures released by authorities in Valencia.They come from 26 countries, mainly from Africa but also Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Pakistan, according to Doctors Without Borders (MSF).Chartered by a French aid group, Aquarius rescued the migrants off Libya’s coast last weekend.MSF, who along with French charity SOS Mediterranee were treating the migrants on board the ship, said two passengers drowned last weekend when the ship first encountered difficulties off Libya.Refused entryItaly’s new populist government and Malta refused to let Aquarius dock in their ports, accusing each other of failing to meet their humanitarian and EU commitments.Spain eventually stepped in and agreed to receive the refugees as a “political gesture” to “oblige Europe to forge a common policy to a common problem”, Foreign Minister Josep Borrell said.Madrid yesterday said it had accepted an offer from France — who had angered Rome by branding it irresponsible over the vessel rejection — to welcome Aquarius migrants who “meet the criteria for asylum”.Two countries will “work together” to handle the arrival, Spain’s deputy prime minister Carmen Calvo said.Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez thanked French President Emmanuel Macron for his gesture, saying it was “exactly the kind of cooperation Europe needs” at this hour. Source: euronews (in English)/YouTube‘Profound’ changesThe plight of the Aquarius has again highlighted the failure of EU member states to work together to deal with the influx of migrant arrivals since 2015.After Rome’s decision to ban the Aquarius, Macron and Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte met on Friday and agreed that the EU should set up asylum processing centres in Africa to prevent “voyages of death”.They also demanded “profound” changes to the EU’s asylum rules which put the migrant burden on their port of entry to Europe — mainly Italy and Greece.Italy’s far-right Interior Minister Matteo Salvini warned Saturday that other NGO operated rescue ships would also be banned from docking.“While the Aquarius is sailing towards Spain, two other Dutch NGO operated vessels (Lifeline and Seefuchs) have arrived off the Libyan coast, to wait for their human cargos once the people smugglers abandon them,” Salvini said in a Facebook post.“These people should know that Italy no longer wants to be any part of this business of clandestine immigration and they will have to look for other ports to go to,” he said.“As minister and as a father, I take this action for the benefit of all,” he added.© – AFP 2018last_img read more

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Twitter photo filters lédition de photos avec filtres pour officialiser le divorce

first_imgTwitter photo filters : l’édition de photos avec filtres pour officialiser le divorce avec Instagram Après avoir fait disparaître son vieux compère Instagram de ses pages, Twitter propose désormais ses propres outils de filtres et de gestion d’images. Au cas où le message n’aurait pas été compris !Twitter et Instagram c’est fini. Après avoir évincé son partenaire dédiée à la photo, le réseau social propose désormais ses propres outils de gestion et de filtres pour les prises de vues.Élaborées avec la firme Aviary, ces nouvelles fonctionnalités sont disponibles avec la dernière mise à jour de Twitter, disponible pour les dispositifs fonctionnant sous iOS et Android.Sur le blog de Twitter, un simple message, “dès aujourd’hui, vous pourrez éditer et améliorer vos photos directement à partir de Twitter”, sonnant définitivement le glas du partenariat entre le réseau social et Instagram. À lire aussiMaladie de Charcot : symptômes, causes, traitement, où en est on ?Le premier avait, dès la semaine dernière, désactivé l’affichage des photos réalisées avec l’application du second, une manière d’officialiser la rupture, et aujourd’hui, de nouveaux outils pour pouvoir se passer des services d’Instagram, spécialisé dans la photo sur réseau social.Accessibles dès la volonté d’intégrer une photo sur un compte, les nouveaux outils permettent de centrer et de découper directement la photo à partir de Twitter. Les filtres photos, eux, de leur donner un aspect artistique de façon plutôt classique (sépia, N/B, effet bleu, vignette…).Le 11 décembre 2012 à 13:27 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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AK Juneau city manager People genuinely dont have somewhere to go

first_imgA tent city sprang up in Alaska’s capital city this spring. Juneau is struggling with a ballooning homeless population and so far efforts to crack down have just moved the problem around.Campers gather near a small group of tents about noon Thursday near the 300 block of Egan Drive in Juneau. (Photo by Tripp J Crouse/KTOO)Listen nowIn an encampment on the edge of town there’s steak grilling on a propane stove. Tents began appearing in this wooded area about three weeks ago.“I set up mine and then I woke up and there were three or four next to me,” Kevin Howard, 44, tent city resident. “They followed, it just kind of came in waves. Everybody here looks after each other and nobody does nothing to nobody. We make sure everybody’s OK in the morning. ‘Need something to eat? Need some water?’ We look after each other here.”Juneau has been wrestling with a rising homeless population. Responding to complaints from merchants, the Juneau Assembly passed an ordinance this winter banning camping on private property in the downtown core.53-year-old David Waits was among those who sheltered in front of a storefront to keep out of the wind and snow.“This past winter was cold,” Watts said. “I stayed in the doorways with just a blanket. It’d be like 7 degrees out. You just gotta survive.”The anti-camping ordinance went into effect this spring. That led people to move onto public property namely, Marine Park where cruise ships dock.Last month the city directed police to ticket anyone in the park after hours. Howard and Waits say officers told campers: “You guys get your (expletive) out of here or otherwise it goes in the trash.” Howard says the police officers  threw everybody out of the doorways and out of the park and that’s why they have congregated where they did.Critics of the anti-camping ordinance had warned that a crackdown would just move the problem around.“What happened is what we’ve seen happen in other communities that have similar ordinances is they are displacing homeless individuals,” Alaska Coalition on Housing and Homelessness director, Brian Wilson said. His group unsuccessfully argued against the camping ban.“If we displace these individuals again, I’m not really sure where they’re going to go,” Wilson said.The city of Juneau is coming around to this reality and officials say police aren’t planning on moving against camp dwellers unless they get a trespassing complaint from the landowner.In this case that’s the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority. Wyn Menefee, deputy director of the trust’s land office, says the waterfront acreage is in the process of being sold to private developers.“If it were to get into a situation where it started in hindering the ability to make revenue off of the trust, we may have to do something further about it,” Menefee said. “But right now it hasn’t stopped us from doing what we intend to do with the parcel.”About half of Juneau’s homeless population report suffering from mental illness. That’s according to a spring survey conducted by social workers who canvassed the community.Brian Wilson says of the 96 unsheltered people that social workers interviewed 45 said they had mental health issues or concerns.“That’s simply an under-reported number as well,” Wilson said.The irony of the mentally ill trespassing on Mental Health Trust Authority land is not lost on Steve Williams, the authority’s chief of operations.“We’re actively engaged in the community on a number of different levels and probably target this population in one way or the other,” Williams said.One of the projects the trust is helping fund is Juneau Housing First. It’s an apartment complex slated to open this summer and house 32 of the community’s most vulnerable homeless residents.Brian Wilson says Housing First is sorely needed but won’t solve the community’s homeless crisis that’s forcing people to sleep outside.“The folks that we’re seeing down at the camp are candidates for Housing First interventions but at the current state of our capacity, we don’t have that here locally,” Wilson said. “We need a lot more units.”In the meantime this encampment appears to be growing. The city has tried to coax homeless people to use the city-run Thane campground. But as it’s two miles down an unlit road with no bus service, people here say they feel safer closer to town. But even so many say they sleep with one eye open.The city and the trust authority have received at least one complaint from the public concerned about health and sanitation. That will inevitably be an issue if the camp remains here long term.But a recent visit showed a tidy camp with very little trash in sight. David Waits says there’s a sense of pride about making the best out of what little you have.“We’re all the same – it doesn’t matter how much money you make or how much you have or anything else,” Waits said. “We’re all common people. I’m a Lakota Sioux Indian and we believe everybody’s related. Nobody’s higher or lower than the next person.”So with few options available for Juneau’s homeless population, it appears a tent city on the edge of town has become the status quo.last_img read more

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Jail authorities hiding Khaleda illness

first_img.The jail authorities are not giving accurate information about BNP chairperson Khaleda Zia’s health condition, her lawyers alleged on Wednesday.The lawyers claimed that former prime minister Khaleda, in prison in Zia Orphanage Trust graft case, needs treatment.The BNP chairperson was not produced before the court on Wednesday.”We are very worried as we are not getting any news about her health condition. They are not saying anything clearly,” Khaleda’s lawyer Sanaullah Mia said.He said that the government and the prosecutor are not giving any details about her illness.Another lawyer Aminul Islam said, “We are worried. She (Khaleda Zia) needs better treatment. Today the state proved that what we had said in the bail hearing was true.”  Mosharraf Hossain Kajol, the lawyer of the Anti-Corruption Commission in the case, said he hoped the proceedings could be completed by 5 April.When asked why the jail authorities did not produce Khaleda Zia before court, he said that there could be various reasons.”She is in jail now. Now it is the duty of the jail authorities to look after her. I have nothing to say in this regard,” he said.last_img read more

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Bush Doctor Makes The Cut For Five Decades

first_imgBy Mark F. Gray, AFRO Staff Writer, mgray@afro.comFor Black men the place for logic and social commentary has often been the barber shop.  Great debates of sports, politics and life have been passionately discussed, and many of the world’s problems have been solved in the down time customers face while waiting for their haircuts.Capitol Heights native and master barber Nathaniel “Nat” Mathis is known as the “Bush Doctor” and celebrating his 20th year as a member of the Smithsonian Museum of American History’s, “Business History Collection.”  In his book, “Portrait of a Professional: Nat the Bush Doctor Story,” he chronicles how his passion for a hairstyle that was the symbol of the Black Power movement of the 1960’s early 1970’s became the platform for him to carve a niche in American history.“Bush Doctor” Nathaniel “Nat” Mathis is celebrating 20 years as a member of the Smithsonian Museum of American History’s “Business History Collection.” (Courtesy Photo)“I always believed we’re in the people business,” Mathis tells the AFRO, 50 years since he was first featured in the paper in 1969.Mathis never meant to be an activist or set out to make history.  However, by embracing and popularizing the symbols of expressions of the afro hairstyle and cornrows of that time, he found his place in that movement.  He is credited for being the first barber to create the afro haircut and a pioneer in afrocentric hair care.“Bush Doctor” Nathaniel “Nat” Mathis, who was featured in the AFRO in 1969, is celebrating over five decades in the business and 20 years as a member of the Smithsonian Museum of American History’s “Business History Collection.” (AFRO Archives Images)He is the child of a single mother who was born in 1946 at Gallagher Hospital in the District.  She didn’t know in 1957 that a $50 Christmas gift to her son would lead to the launch of his career.  Mathis, then 11, got his first set of clippers, which was the genesis to his future livelihood and has earned him local, national and international acclaim.“When my mother gave me the money I bought a set of clippers and the rest is history,” Mathis said.  “Once the word got out everybody in the neighborhood was coming over to my house to get a cut.”Five years later when her turned 16, his acumen for hair styling crossed gender barriers.  Mathis learned to style women’s hair and earned a barber-stylist license.  That proved to be a fortuitous decision as he was able to work for Soft Sheen products as a consultant, which gave him international exposure. He helped the company expand into Senegal, Cameroon and Nigeria.By 1976 Mathis was the first African American to compete in the World Hair Olympics and in 1981 he won the gold medal.  Always the innovator he would later create The Mathis Hair Care System which he says is a combination of science and artistry that uses a systematic concept of individualized care based on the texture of a client’s hair such as wavy, curly, straight, fine, coarse or any combination.However, his two patents which are part of the Smithsonian and Reginald Lewis Museum in Baltimore, are what have made him a legend.  In 1974, he created the Barber/Stylist tool organizer, which is a vest that allows stylists to keep their tools of the trade on their person.  Last month he earned his second patent after creating special shelving for utensils that allow barbers to work in an organized space.“After four decades it all seems to be coming together,” Mathis said.Mathis is celebrating his golden anniversary this month and remains busy.  He now applies his trade in a home based business in District Heights, where pictures of celebrities whose hair he’s styled or cut are prominently displayed throughout the shop.  These days he takes pride in sharing the wisdom he’s acquired through five decades.last_img read more

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Govt employee held in Malda for taking cut money

first_imgKolkata: A government employee from Manickchawk block in Malda was arrested on Saturday for his alleged role in misappropriating funds which were channelised for the government schemes.The incident has already triggered a furor in the district. The misappropriation had allegedly been carried out by the accused when he was posted at Ratua block of the same district. It may be mentioned here that a Trinamool Congress leader from Malda’s Ratua was arrested on Wednesday for receiving cut money. It had been alleged that the arrested officer might have worked in collusion with the Trinamool Congress leader, who used to serve as Panchayat head at the time of the incident. It was alleged that the accused government employee has misappropriated huge amounts of funds. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataPolice in various districts have acted promptly after Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee issued an instruction saying that none of her party workers will be spared if they have grabbed public money. Giving a strong message against the age-old practice of receiving cut money from government funds, Banerjee, during a recent meeting with councilors, said that if any party leader in any level is found siphoning off money generated for the development works, stringent action would be taken against him/her. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateThe accused Trinamool Congress leader, Sukesh Yadav, also allegedly received huge amounts as cut money. He had been the head of Mahanandatola Gram Panchayat in Ratua. It has been learnt that Yadav was accused of taking money from the funds allocated for Nirmal Bangla Mission, under which the arrested government employee had been working. Chaos also erupted at Mangolkot in East Burdwan on Sunday, after some people alleged that some local Trinamool Congress activists had taken money against some assurances to set up houses for them. A meeting had taken place, where the accused TMC activists put the blame on a local party leader who eventually denied the allegation during his interview with a local television channel later.last_img read more

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Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL With 300 Price Cut Can Be

first_img Share Tweet Submit Four days ago, Verizon presented you with a killer deal, offering a $300 price cut on the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL with a few conditions attached. Unfortunately, that was for customers that would walk into a nearby Verizon store. Now, things have taken a different turn, with the U.S.-based carrier offering you guys more flexibility to own Google’s latest flagship model.You Can Now Obtain a Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL With a $300 Discount Without Physically Being Present at a Physical StoreIf it is such a hassle to get a Pixel 2 or Pixel 2 XL model from a Verizon outlet, the deal has been made much sweeter by offering you guys to take advantage of the offer from the comfort of your own home.For those that forgot or are reading this for the first time, this $300 discount that you will receive is going to be provided to you over the course of 24 months, but if you do the math correctly, it also means that you will be able to get a Pixel 2 for as low as $350. We’ve done the calculations for you and you will be paying the following for all storage models.Pixel 2 (64GB storage model): $14.58 per month for 24 months.Pixel 2 (128GB storage model): $18.74 per month for 24 months.Pixel 2 XL (64GB storage model): $22.91 per month for 24 months.Pixel 2 XL (128GB storage model): $27.08 per month for 24 months.If you want to avail the offer, just click on the links given below and it will take you to Verizon’s website, allowing you to pay for either the Pixel 2 or Pixel 2 XL at a very attractive discount.Is this deal a sweet one or would you rather pick something else?Buy the Pixel 2Buy the Pixel 2 XLlast_img read more

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first_imgFind more news and videos from AAPM. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Technology Reports View all 9 items Videos | March 22, 2011 IBA – Treatment Safety and QA Verification Increase Patient Safety Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. IBA’s Compass 3-D treatment verification and dose analysis software helps reduce radiation exposure to critical structures. The system creates a beam model and measures 20 millisecond multileaf collimator (MLC) treatments and integrates this into gantry positions. The system then imports this data and reconstructs the dose using the patient’s computed tomography (CT) data sets. The software assesses radiation exposure to all structures in the treatment area. It will highlight structures receiving higher than anticipated dose. For more information: www.SaferRadiationTherapy.com Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.center_img Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Recent Videos View all 606 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Women’s Health View all 62 items Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Information Technology View all 220 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Find more SCCT news and videoslast_img read more

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Lawmaker attacks torture defense by former CIA leader

first_img Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvement Feinstein, whose staff sifted through millions of CIA documents describing the interrogation program for six years while she chaired the intelligence committee, issued a statement Monday evening challenging Morell, who is a consultant for CBS News and a senior counselor at Beacon Global Strategies, a consulting firm that includes close aides to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton.“Former CIA Deputy Director Michael Morell’s new book repeats the same false charges made by other former CIA personnel when the Senate Intelligence Committee’s CIA torture report was made public in December 2014,” Feinstein said.“This is not surprising, considering the book’s co-author helped coordinate the CIA’s unofficial response to the committee’s study and co-wrote two other books with ex-CIA officials — George Tenet and Jose Rodriguez — that also attempted to justify the CIA’s failings,” she said.Feinstein was referring to Bill Harlow, a former CIA spokesman who co-authored the memoirs of former CIA director Tenet, who helped create the torture program, and Rodriguez, who supervised it for a time. Harlow also helped coordinate an effort by former officials last year to rebut the torture report. Ex-FBI agent details raid on Phoenix body donation facility Comments   Share   New Year’s resolution: don’t spend another year in a kitchen you don’t like Arizona families, Arizona farms: A legacy of tradition embracing animal care and comfort through modern technology How Arizona is preparing the leader of the next generation WASHINGTON (AP) — A new book by a former CIA leader seeks to “justify the CIA’s failings” with inaccurate criticisms of the Senate intelligence committee’s investigation into the agency’s use of torture, the key senator behind the investigation said Monday.In “The Great War of Our Time,” due to be published Tuesday, former deputy CIA director Michael Morell defends the CIA’s use of harsh interrogations and denounces the committee’s 6,770-page report as “deeply flawed,” and a disservice to the nation. Morell says waterboarding, sleep deprivation and other brutal techniques used on al-Qaida detainees by the CIA produced reams of crucially important intelligence, disputing the Senate report’s conclusion that they didn’t.center_img Milstead says best way to stop wrong-way incidents is driving sober Feinstein said that although Morell is one of the few people with access to the classified version of the report, he told her he never read it, instead relying on the 518-page public summary and analysis by his staff.In his book, Morell calls the Senate report deeply flawed, writing at one point, “most of the errors are ones that even a smart high school student would not make.” He says it cherry-picked documents to reach a foregone conclusion, and says it read like a “prosecutor’s brief.”But he cites only a handful of what he deems specific errors, none of which would appear to refute the central conclusions of the report: that the program was badly managed; that it was more brutal than understood by anyone outside the interrogation rooms; and that it failed to produce unique, lifesaving, otherwise unobtainable intelligence, the standard upon which it was justified.Feinstein disputed that the study’s findings were pre-ordained, and she noted that the Senate report “reached many of the same conclusions as the CIA’s own internal study.” Morell did not address the internal study, which is known as the Panetta Review because it was prepared for then-CIA Director Leon Panetta. It remains classified, and the CIA says it was merely an internal examination of what the Senate committee might conclude. Sponsored Stories Top Stories Harlow, in a telephone interview, said Morell “stands behind every word in the book.”Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. New Valley school lets students pick career-path academieslast_img read more

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Refinance Volume Lifts Slightly in April

first_img Share The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) released its latest Refinance Report, examining data as of the end of April 2014. FHFA found that overall refinance volume rose slightly in April, but remained at levels more comparable to those seen in 2008.The agency noted that mortgage rates remained between 4–4.5 percent since June 2013. In April, the average interest rate on a 30-year fixed rate mortgage stayed put at March’s rate at 4.34 percent.Roughly 20,000 refinances were completed through the Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP) in April, bringing total HARP refinances to approximately 3.2 million since the program’s inception.The government agency noted that borrowers who refinanced through HARP had a lower delinquency rate compared to borrowers who were eligible for HARP but did not refinance through the program.Since the beginning of the program, roughly 2.7 million loans refinanced through HARP were for primary residences, with approximately 100,000 for second homes and 395,000 for investment properties.HARP refinances continued to represent a significant portion of homes that are deeply underwater. FHFA noted that 10 percent of loans refinanced through HARP had a loan-to-value ratio greater than 125 percent. Borrowers with a loan-to-value ratio greater than 105 percent made up 30 percent of the volume of HARP loans.”Year to date through April 2014, 24 percent of HARP refinances for underwater borrowers were for shorter-term 15- and 20-year mortgages, which build equity faster than traditional 30-year mortgages,” FHFA said.HARP continued to account for a substantial portion of total refinance volume in certain states, according to FHFA. “Year to date through April 2014, HARP refinances represented 40 percent of total refinances in Georgia and 37 percent of the total refinances in Florida, nearly double the 20 percent of total refinances nationwide over the same period,” FHFA said. in Daily Dose, Data, Government, Headlines, News FHFA HARP Loan-to-Value Ratio Refinances 2014-06-24 Colin Robinscenter_img June 24, 2014 461 Views Refinance Volume Lifts Slightly in Aprillast_img read more

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5 Brussels Belgium from £32 With amazing Art Nou

first_img5. Brussels, Belgium from £32With amazing Art Nouveau architecture, the impressive Grand Palace and many ‘quarters’ – like the Matonge African quarter – to explore, you’ll need a sugar boost to keep your energy levels topped up. Make a pit-stop and sample some of the world’s finest chocolate in one of the many sophisticated sweet shops in this cosmopolitan city – Frederic Blondeel’s even roasts its own coffee beans.Check prices 2. Shannon, Ireland from £28Sit back and soak in the beautiful scenery from the banks of the River Shannon, County Clare. The town itself is relatively new, built in the 1960s, but a day trip out to the surrounding countryside is a great chance to get some peace and quiet. Pack your hiking boots; there are many trails in the area, including the Templecronan Loop, an easy 5km walk to see a 12th century church.Check prices 4. Gdansk, Poland from £28Pick up a real steal and get over to Gdansk where you’ll definitely get plenty of bang for your buck. This old port city is full of bars and restaurants, cathedrals and theatres, and then there’s the beach. What more could you ask for? And all for less than £30!Check prices 3. Basel, Switzerland from £20Aside from being a great spot to head off in to the French Alps in search of some late season ski, Basel is also the place for party lovers. The country’s third largest city is a stone’s throw from the dance music heartlands of France and Germany and clubs like Nordstern attract a whole host of famous international DJs.Check prices The worst of winter may be behind us, but it’s a pretty long stretch until summer. Escape the daily grind and treat yourself to a cheeky weekend away.From less than £35* return this March, you could be gorging on gourmet chocolates in Brussels, or kicking back on the banks of the river Shannon in Ireland. Here are six bargain city breaks:1. Düsseldorf, Germany from £20Modern architecture mingles with high fashion and an arts scene to rival even the supreme hipsterdom, Berlin. It may be Germany’s wealthiest city, but this doesn’t mean that you have to break the bank during your stay. With a cheap flight and good deals available on accommodation, you’ll have plenty of pennies left to spend in all those designer boutiques and German beer houses.Check prices RelatedFlash sale: Norwegian St Patrick’s Day flight sale to America from £134Norwegian have just announced a huge St Patrick’s Day sale with flights to America from only £134! This four day sale offers 15% off flights in summer from the UK and Ireland. Things you need to know: – These are super limited and end 19 March. Embrace your inner Sonic…8 flights for under £45A smorgasbord of ideas for short breaks in unheralded European cities, all with flights for less than £45!How to have a family holiday for less than £500It’s not too late to book your August family holiday! We’ve found five holidays in Europe that will set you back less than £500 for flights and accommodation for a family of four, plus a few essentials for any family getaway; ice cream and beer. Check out these amazing value… 6. Eindhoven, Netherlands from £27Over Amsterdam? Check out Eindhoven, a cool alternative and with just as much nightlife. Along the Stratumseind there are over 40 bars, more than any other street in the Netherlands. So switch ‘The Dam’ for this smart Dutch city and to avoid all those typical stag and hen parties and save some cash for getting the rounds in.Check pricesGet some more tips on bagging a flight bargain and check these out:Find cheap flights with ‘Best Time to Book’ tool from Skyscanner Get the best air fares with Skyscanner Price Alerts! 20 money saving travel tips and secrets *All prices are correct at time of publication and are for return travel in March from the UK.Skyscanner is the world’s travel search engine, helping your money go further on flights, hotels and car hire.ReturnOne wayMulti-cityFromAdd nearby airports ToAdd nearby airportsDepart14/08/2019Return21/08/2019Cabin Class & Travellers1 adult, EconomyDirect flights onlySearch flights Maplast_img read more

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Rep Hoitenga announces bipartisan plan to lower auto insurance rates in Michigan

first_img26Sep Rep. Hoitenga announces bipartisan plan to lower auto insurance rates in Michigan Categories: Hoitenga News,News State Rep. Michele Hoitenga of Manton today joined a bipartisan coalition announcing plans to fix Michigan’s broken auto insurance system and significantly lower rates for drivers.Michigan now has the highest auto insurance rates in the nation, and one of the highest rates of uninsured drivers. Hoitenga supports legislation that will lower the cost of auto insurance by offering motorists more coverage options, reining in medical costs and fighting abuse.“Drivers are outraged we have the highest auto insurance rates in the nation. The system is rigged against them,” Hoitenga said after helping to unveil the reform plan at the state Capitol. “It’s the No. 1 issue I hear about. I am going to fight for the reforms that the status quo has blocked for decades, and finally bring lower auto insurance rates to the people of Michigan.”Michigan’s average full coverage auto insurance premium cost – nearly $2,400 per year – is 82 percent above the national average and twice as high as those in neighboring states, according to a recent report from Insure.com.The new bipartisan plan continues benefits for Michiganders already receiving lifetime health care after a catastrophic traffic accident. The plan also gives motorists the option to continue to buy unlimited personal injury protection (PIP) coverage, or buy more affordable alternative coverage plans.The legislation:Provides a guaranteed rate reduction for drivers who choose certain coverage plans alternative to the unlimited plan;Gives individuals the choice on the extent of PIP coverage as part of their auto insurance. Choice levels include $250,000, $500,000 or unlimited;Allows seniors age 62 or older with lifetime health care benefits the option to opt out of PIP coverage to avoid the current double taxation;Establishes fee schedules and attendant care limits to significantly lower medical costs related to auto injuries;Helps the state ensure insurance companies are complying with state law, and creates a fraud authority to address fraudulent claims;Provides a state review of the Michigan Catastrophic Claims Association (MCCA) to make sure motorists are not overpaying for insurance; andAddresses attorney fee costs and unfounded lawsuits while eliminating attorney conflict of interests with medical providers.“Why do medical providers charge two and three times as much to fix a broken ankle from an auto accident compared to a broken ankle from a soccer game?” Hoitenga said. “Why do auto insurance cases clog our courts? All of these things combine to raise our auto insurance rates. Our new plan will provide the tools we need to truly fix these problems and keep more money in the pockets of Michigan drivers.”Hoitenga is a member of the House Insurance Committee, which will consider the legislation.#####last_img read more

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Rep Bizon lists priorities following governors address

first_img23Jan Rep. Bizon lists priorities following governor’s address State Rep. Dr. John Bizon today said he has a list of priorities for the current legislative session following the governor’s State of the State address in Lansing.Bizon, of Battle Creek, said no-fault automobile insurance reform and continuing to grow the state economy top his list of key issues the Legislature should focus on in the next 11 months. He also puts priority on relieving the tax burden on senior citizens.“Just a few years ago Michigan was on top of every list no state wants to be on – high unemployment, weak budget, zero dollars in a contingency account,” Bizon said. “Through responsible budgeting and legislative reforms we have turned that around, and today Michigan is thriving. We must work hard to continue that recovery.”Bizon said one reason for Michigan’s good economic standing is tax relief for Michigan families and senior citizens. He has championed tax reduction and will continue to fight for lower taxes.“We have made significant headway in reducing the tax hardship for families, but more can be accomplished,” Bizon said. “I am particularly focused on easing taxes on seniors, who have already been impacted by the so-called pension tax that was enacted in 2011.”Bizon said he supported legislation that would have given drivers choices in no-fault coverage and reduced rates and will continue to fight for no-fault reform.“Our auto no-fault system is broken, and it’s time we eliminate sky-high premiums and medical procedure costs that are far above costs for identical procedures outside the no-fault system,” Bizon said. “Michigan has one of the highest premiums for insurance, and that’s simply unacceptable.”##### Categories: Bizon News,Newslast_img read more

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